Outside the Lines: Crohns, opponents not stopping Anderson

It&8217;s much more than a bunker that hugs the backside of a sloping green or a

water hazard on a narrow par three. These challenges are just preparation

for Briarwood golfer Rosson Anderson to capture his dreams of a repeat a

state title next week in Opelika or to one day play for the green jacket in

Augusta.

Crohn’s disease is a challenge Anderson faces every day

&045; fighting it with

up to 20 pills a day.

Monday, Anderson was able to join together two of his great passions, golf

and helping find a cure for Crohn’s. A charity golf tournament for the

Alabama/Northwest Florida chapter of the Crohn&8217;s and Colitis Foundation of

America raised $264,000 Monday at Shoal Creek, well over last year&8217;s

record-setting one-day total of $75,000 and above tournament director Mac

McLendon&8217;s goal of $250,000.

&8220;I didn&8217;t think it would be possible. I told him (when he first told me his

goal), &8216;There&8217;s no way. I don&8217;t see how,&8217;&8221; Anderson said.

On top of the financial support raised Monday, Anderson was equally excited,

if not more, about the number of golfers in attendance who have no ties to

the disease, but who wanted to help find a cure.

Anderson was diagnosed with Crohn&8217;s at age 10 and has since had two

surgeries to remove about 20-something inches of his large intestine each

time.

&8220;There&8217;s not a cure yet, but that&8217;s what we&8217;re tying to do with these golf

tournaments,&8221; said Anderson who has been in remission the last four years.

He still has minor setbacks from the disease that keep him from playing a

golf tournament here or there, including one match this season. However he

doesn&8217;t let it stop him.

Anderson also views the game as good exercise for him, since he can&8217;t overdo

it, and considers the game a blessing from God.

&8220;I think God had a plan stored up in me to play golf. I love the game and

everything about it. It&8217;s helps me to just go play,&8221; Anderson said. &8220;When

you&8217;re on the golf course, you&8217;re having fun, and you want to do that even

when you&8217;re doing bad.&8221;

With plans to play for Auburn University next year and one day join the PGA

Tour.

However, his eye is on the next step

&045; an individual and state title next

Tuesday