Turner knows the value of going abroad

The University of Montevallo has a good thing in Scott Turner.

After already teaching in Kenya under a Fulbright Scholarship for four years, he is now working to eventually establish an Asian studies program in the university&8217;s curriculum.

Turner, apparently, knows the value of international travel on an education.

I don&8217;t know Turner personally, but I would bet my savings that his experiences abroad have given him fresh insight on our country.

For many, moving from a familiar homeland to live in a county with an entirely different perspective on where you came from is an eye-opening, brain-expanding experience.

I personally gained an entirely new perspective on America after living in London for four months in the heat of the 2004 election. Instead of protecting my conservative, southern American brain from any possible infiltration by actively interacting in the English cultures, I took the time to listen and observe what people were saying.

I came home, not a radical liberal or hating the land I came from, but simply more informed. I know how people like you or me living in another country might perceive America, whether these perceptions were accurate or not.

My love for America is not blind. I have taken off my rose colored glasses and now love the great land I live in with all of it&8217;s flaws and past mistakes.