Cure for bullying not easy

In the comments for the story, “Board of Education passes student anti-harassment policy,” one reader simply wrote, “There is a very simple cure for bullying. It is called knocking them on their ____. It has always worked, always can. (Quit) letting the sissies of the world ruin our children.”

We beg to differ. While bullying has typically been a problem in any school, public or private, there are so many varied ways for kids or teens to bully their peers today — many of which begin with technology.

A hurtful comment or message sent through Facebook, MySpace, Twitter or just through a text message can damage a child just as much as a shove on the playground or being laughed at in the hall.

Tina Meier, who recently spoke at an anti-bullying forum sponsored by Shelby County Schools, understands the dangers of cyber-bullying. Her daughter, Megan, 14, hung herself in October 2006 after being bullied through her MySpace account by, of all people, a neighbor’s mother, as well as two other girls.

Megan Meier’s tragic story proves anyone can be a bully, and while it might be possible for a teenager to face up to other teens, not many teens would have the courage to stand up to an adult.

We support the board’s passing of the anti-harassment policy. While the policy itself may not solve the problem of bullying, it can give bullied students and their parents the knowledge the school system is on their side.