Alabaster BOE members soon getting paid

Alabaster Board of Education members will begin receiving $600 a month this July. (File)

Alabaster Board of Education members will begin receiving $600 a month this July. (File)

By NEAL WAGNER / Managing Editor

The five members of the Alabaster Board of Education soon will begin collecting $600 per month for serving on the board after the School Board approved the compensation plan at the recommendation of the city school superintendent.

During its May 12 meeting, the School Board voted 3-0 to approve the compensation plan, which was recommended by Alabaster School Superintendent Wayne Vickers. Board members Adam Moseley, Derek Henderson and John Myrick voted in favor of the motion, board member Ty Quarles abstained from voting on the matter, and board member Linda Church was absent.

“It will be $600 a month, and that is what is allowed by law,” Vickers said during a May 12 interview. “None of the board members asked for this. I felt it was necessary based on the level of commitment each board member has shown up to this point.”

The five Alabaster Board of Education members – Adam Moseley, Ty Quarles, John Myrick, Derek Henderson and Linda Church – will begin collecting the $600 monthly paycheck on July 1. The School Board members currently are not compensated.

Vickers said the compensation plan is in line with many other school boards across the state, and noted other municipal boards, such as city councils, also are compensated for their service.

“We are very fortunate to have a quality Board of Education. As a school system, you are only as good as your board,” Vickers said. “Our board is very committed, beyond just showing up to a meeting once a month. There was one month I think we had four board meetings.”

Vickers said the board members have been instrumental in helping the Alabaster School System – which separated from the Shelby County School System in July 2013 – get off the ground.

After the School Board meeting, Alabaster City Council member Sophie Martin said she supported the compensation plan “100 percent.”

“Initially, we decided not to make it a paid position so we would get the right kind of applicant,” Martin said. “Now, I think the compensation is hard-earned.”