City Council approves Indian Lake Drive property rezoning

The Pelham City Council approved the rezoning of a 15.8-acre property on Indian Lake Drive from A-1 Agricultural district to RG Residential Garden Home district during a July 7 meeting. (Contributed)

The Pelham City Council approved the rezoning of a 15.8-acre property on Indian Lake Drive from A-1 Agricultural district to RG Residential Garden Home district during a July 7 meeting. (Contributed)

By MOLLY DAVIDSON / Staff Writer

PELHAM—The Pelham City Council approved the rezoning of 15.8 acres of land on Indian Lake Drive near Pelham’s northern border during a July 7 City Council meeting. The land was rezoned from A-1 Agricultural district to RG Residential Garden Home district for the building of a 41-home development.

Rezoning of the Indian Lake Drive property for a garden home development originally came before the Pelham Planning Commission on Dec. 12 and Jan. 9. The Planning Commission failed to approve rezoning for the development plan, which called for 62 garden homes and the rezoning of more than 21 acres of land.

The project was assumed by developer Connor Farmer. A new plan was presented to the Planning Commission, and rezoning was approved during a July 12 meeting.

The new plan called for a reduction in number of lots, from 62 to 41, and a reduction in land to be rezoned, from more than 21 acres to 15.8 acres, leaving a natural ridge on the property untouched.

The plan also includes an updated drainage system, adding two strategically placed, shallow detention ponds to replace the existing 14-foot pond.

“I think you have done a great job (redesigning) this,” Planning Commission member Bob Sinclair said of the new plan during the July 12 meeting. “I don’t think it could be any better.”

The rezoning request came before the City Council during a June 16 public hearing. Several area residents voiced concerns about potential flooding and increased traffic along Shelby County 261.

Farmer addressed flooding questions and explained the two detention ponds in the new development plan would cut water runoff “in half.”

Hayes sympathized with residents’ flooding concerns, but said, “building these houses isn’t going to increase the amount of water”, explaining the development and detention ponds will work to slow runoff.

The Pelham City Council unanimously approved the rezoning of the 15.8 acre property during the July 7 City Council meeting.

City Councilwoman Karyl Rice made the motion to approve the rezoning, adding “this is a very good plan for that property.”