Historic Shelby County captured

From left, Stacy Gill Perry, photographer/artist, and Sandra Annonio, with the Shelby County Arts Council. (Contributed)

From left, Stacy Gill Perry, photographer/artist, and Sandra Annonio, with the Shelby County Arts Council. (Contributed)

By CATHERINE MOORE / Community Columnist
The strains of live piano music followed visitors through the new exhibit at the Shelby County Arts Council, “Historic Shelby County: An Artistic Perspective.” The exhibit featured local photographers Hank Siegel, Paris Farzad, Rachel Brown Fowler and Stacy Gill Perry.
Many images in Shelby County hold significant historic value, and these local photographers captured different perspectives that represented how they saw Shelby County’s history in the people, the buildings and in nature.
Stacy Gill Perry, an Auburn University graduate with a background in architecture, took what some may consider sterile substances or cold, unemotional objects and brought them to life. Her photographs contributed a unique perspective on common sights found in Shelby County.
“History is often thought of as a collection of dates and events that are often hard to identify with on a personal level…I find myself imagining the lives of those that came before and the materials they created and used daily,” Perry explained. “I am in constant amazement of how the same substances used then to shelter, clothe and inspire have shaped our lives today.”
The work displayed at the exhibit represented the rich history and portraits of Shelby County. Also included were the works of local quilting and ceramic artists, as well as the work of Sandra Annonio, one of the Shelby County Arts Council’s very own. Each of the artists sparked the imagination of visitors through their unique and thought-provoking imagery.
The exhibit left visitors with feelings of reflection and perspective. Perry’s work, displaying images of tactile elements in Shelby County, was simple but denoted a colorful history. As she stated, “These elements of steel, cotton, concrete and brick have stood the test of time and continue to tell the stories of days gone by in Shelby County.”
The Exhibit will be on display until Nov. 3, 2014. Gallery Hours Monday – Thursday,10 a.m. – 5 p.m. For more information on upcoming events and classes at the Shelby County Arts Council visit Shelbycountyartscouncil.com or call 669-0044.