City looking to demolish more dilapidated houses

The Alabaster City Council is looking to approve the demolition of several dilapidated houses in the city, including this one at 731 First Street South. (Contributed)

The Alabaster City Council is looking to approve the demolition of several dilapidated houses in the city, including this one at 731 First Street South. (Contributed)

By NEAL WAGNER / Managing Editor

ALABASTER – The Alabaster City Council is looking to demolish four dilapidated houses – three of which front U.S. 31 – and will seek pubic comment on the matter during upcoming public hearings.

During its Jan. 26 meeting, the council set public hearings for its Feb. 23 meeting to discuss tearing down dilapidated houses on four properties: 410 Fifth Avenue S.E., 267 First Street South, 701 First Street South and 731 First Street South. First Street South is also known as U.S. 31, which is a major roadway stretching through the city.

Fifth Avenue Southeast is off Shelby County 11 in the Simmsville community, 731 First Street South and 701 First Street South are near the intersection of U.S. 31 and Seventh Avenue Southeast and 267 First Street South is near the old Alabaster City Hall building off U.S. 31.

The public hearings will be held during the council’s Feb. 23 meeting, which will start at 7 p.m. at Alabaster City Hall at 1953 Municipal Way.

All four properties contain long-abandoned, overgrown residences, said Alabaster City Manager George Henry.

The Fifth Avenue Southeast property contains an abandoned mobile home, 267 First Street South contains a dilapidated house being consumed by overgrowth and the majority of the structure at 701 First Street South is covered by years of vegetation growth.

The house at 731 First Street South has a partially caved-in roof, unsecured windows and disused Christmas lights hanging from the roof.

The Alabaster Housing and Abatement Board previously recommended the City Council approve the four homes’ demolition.

If the City Council agrees to demolish the homes, the property owners will have a certain amount of time to bring their property into compliance with city code before Alabaster pays a crew to tear down the structures.

If the city funds the demolitions, it will attach the cost as a lien on the properties.