Living your best life amidst Coronavirus

By BECKY J. BEALL | Pelham Community Column

Life comes at you fast. One day you’re cheering at a little league baseball game and the next day hunkered down in isolation hoping to avoid coronavirus, more specifically COVID-19. This new buzz word has taken over the news, small talk, workplace water fountain conversation and has dominated discussions between family, friends and even strangers.

An apple a day; a hopeful meditation for the times. (Contributed / Becky Beall)

While the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Department of State have been conscientious in keeping the public updated with regard to this global outbreak, fear is still a mounting emotion for many. Folks are fearful for their jobs, their children’s education, shortages of food and supplies, but most of all for their health. As we move forward negotiating unknown waters, it is paramount to participate in some positive practices for protecting yourself and your family, keeping in mind that healthy individuals are typically able to rebound from illnesses such as coronavirus, flu and colds.

How can we help protect ourselves?

  • Soap and warm water, a good lather up and 20 seconds of scrubbing is one of the best defenses for keeping germs at bay.
  • Stay home unless absolutely necessary (medical attention, work and grocery store visits).
  • Social distancing is a term used often today. Simply stated, stay at least six feet away from the next closest person if you must go out.
  • Clean often-touched surfaces well with Clorox or Lysol wipes. Clean phones, steering wheels and anything that is touched regularly.
  • Eat as healthy as possible incorporating lots fruits and veggies as they are higher in vitamins than fast food and the like. Drink lots of water.
  • Practice meditation to keep yourself calm and worry-free. Stress makes the immune system less effective, so take up some home yoga, read positive and motivational materials and speak with positive tones rather than focusing on negative things.
  • Keep a few essentials on-hand in case you develop symptoms. Things like acetaminophen, ibuprofen and Mucinex along with tissues and Gatorade can be helpful.
  • Know your plan—call your health care provider and ask what you should do in case of direct contact or if you begin exhibiting symptoms of COVID-19.

Remember, school is closed for an important reason. It’s not the time for play dates and get togethers. Check on neighbors, especially elderly or immune-compromised, by phone or text. Should you need to take supplies, food or medicine to someone, arrange to drop them off on a porch or in a safe place and limit contact.

Also, keep in mind that there are many things kids can do to get exercise and continue learning. Playing outside with sidewalk chalk (remember hopscotch?), bubbles, toys, water tables, etc. are good ways to get some sunshine and run off excess energy. Even consider having lunch outside. Books are winners for any age and video games in moderation are good time-passers as well as puzzles, playdough and painting.

In time, things will get back to normal, people will once again eat in restaurants and go to concerts. But for now, take care of yourself and each other because yes, life comes at you fast.