Alabaster celebrates the season at annual Christmas parade

By DONNAMY STEELE | Special to the Reporter

ALABASTER – The annual Alabaster Christmas Parade filled the streets of Alabaster on Saturday, Dec. 5.

After months of preparation and deciding what would be best for the community’s health and safety, Parks Director Tim Hamm said they chose to continue with the parade this year.

“For the parade, we talked about what we were going to do and how we were going to make it happen with the pandemic, and we decided to go through with it,” Hamm said. “We extended our route to let people spread out more and made modifications as needed.”

Hamm said the turnout for the Christmas parade was higher than he anticipated.

After having a year with limited events and socializing, the community was excited to get out and celebrate the holiday season with friends and family, Hamm said.

“I didn’t notice a drop in turnout. I actually think even more people came out,” Hamm said. “I think people are itching to get out and feel halfway normal again. I was really pleased with the turnout, and I don’t think it could have gone better than it did.”

The theme for this year’s parade was unique and out of the norm, Hamm said.

It was centralized around hometown heroes such as first responders, medical personnel, educators and other locals who have kept the Alabaster community as safe as possible throughout the last year.

“What we wanted to try and do with that is there have been numerous people who have gone above and beyond in the past year to help out in the community, and we thought teachers, public safety, first responders and people in our medical community should be honored,” Hamm said. “We went outside of the box with that, and those people seemed really honored to be recognized. I think it was important to make this one more about the community than even in the past because it takes the whole community to get through this thing, so it’s important to recognize those who are on the front lines.”

Hamm was glad to witness a great turnout and see the community thrive amidst the pandemic.

“We go out there every year and we do the parade, and I was just really blessed to see everyone out and about doing something as a community,” Hamm said. “We would do it whether one person or thousands come out, but it was amazing to see them still be a part of that and see the kids out and about waving at the floats and getting candy. It was a good event in the middle of this trying year.”